Archive for September, 2008

Great poems

1. Glad tidings be to you O sinners; your intercessor is the prince of righteous
2. Congratulations! the Lord Almighty is Al-Ghaffār, the Forgiver.

The Imām raĥimahullāh contrasts it thus: Sinners should be glad with the hope of intercession by the Prince of Righteous and in the presence of the Oft-Forgiving.

3. The earth under his feet is like the Exalted Throne; and the sole of his foot is above the Throne
4. By Allāh! what a graceful walk thou possess!

The first line is an allusion to the Ascension when RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam went past the Throne and hence, the earth under his feet is as precious as the Throne.

And the second line should actually be: ‘kyā nirālī tarz ki – Allāh! – raftār hai’ But Alahazrat has modified it to fit the meter by replacing the name itself with a pointer instead: ‘nām-e-khudā’ as an interjection.

5. the moon was split; trees spoke and animals prostrate
6. Allāh’s Blessings upon him; he is the refuge, a sanctuary for the world.

The first line mentions miracles of the Prophet şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam which are used to draw the conclusion in the next line: ‘He is the refuge towards whom the world turns.’ Naturally, this is granted by Allāh táālā to His beloved Prophet.

7. He spread them towards the heavens and filled the earth with rain
8. O beloved! We too need the alms given from those blessed hands.

In ĥadīth, there is a story about a companion who complained to RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam about famine and he şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam was sitting on the pulpit. He raised his hands and prayed for rain and before his raised hands came down, the skies began to pour. It poured so much that after a while people complained of flood.

Alahazrat says, when RasūlAllāh şallAllāhu álayhi wa sallam raises his hands towards the heavens, we are flooded with blessings. We are in dire need for you to raise those beautiful hands and give us alms.

More can be found here:  http://alahazrat.blogspot.com/

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